Breakfast, fitness, Food, health, healthy eating, Lifestyle, Lunch, menu planning, organic, recipes

Move over Pumpkin: Sweet Potatoes are here!

There are all kinds of veggies that make their way out during the fall season.  Pumpkin is the all time favorite. It’s the king of the fall veggies. Everything turns pumpkin—POOF! Just like Cinderella’s carriage.  There’s Pumpkin cereal, Pumpkin Spice Latte, Pumpkin Crackers,Pumpkin Stew, Pumpkin Biscotti, Pumpkin Ice Cream.  The list goes on and on.  One local market has over 22 varieties of pumpkin flavored products.  Yes, 22!  Over-kill?  Well, I suppose they have to strike while the iron is hot.

For me, the fall is more about subtlety.  No need to crack yourself over the head with pumpkin everything so that you’re sick of it by the Thanksgiving Day.  Autumn lasts about 60 days.  Sixty wonderful days of leaves changing, brisk winds and cozy sweaters.  So what’s the rush?

The sweet potato is one of those veggies that doesn’t get its time in the spotlight as it should.  It makes an appearance at the Thanksgiving table, but then it’s quickly gone.  But why?  What’s not to love about the sweet potato?  Why shouldn’t they be a part of your healthy lifestyle?

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In a one-cup serving, sweet potatoes have the daily recommended value of:
● 214% of Vitamin A
● 52% of Vitamin C
● 50% of Magnesium
● 36% of Copper
● 27% of Potassium
● 26% of Fiber

In addition:
● Has Anti-Inflammatory Nutrients
● May improve blood sugar regulation
● Filled with Antioxidants

Wow…all that and it tastes good!  Score!

We’ve eaten sweet potatoes several different ways.  Mashed, roasted, fried and even in pie.  But what about a delicious breakfast bar? One filled with oats and quinoa?

Behold my Sweet Potato Quinoa Oat Bars.  These little delights will have you in love well past the autumn season, well into winter!!!  They are delicious, gluten free, and the quinoa is packed with protein to keep you fuller, longer.  I can’t think of anything better!

Sweet Potato Quinoa Oat Breakfast Bar
Makes 16-18 Bars

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Ingredients:
2 cups quick oats
1 ½ cups cooked quinoa
1 15 oz can sweet potato
3 ripe bananas
2 eggs
1/3 cup honey, raw organic
1/3 cup almond butter (or favorite nut butter-I used cashew)
2 tsps vanilla extract
1 ½ tsp baking powder
1 tsp cinnamon, heaping
½ tsp salt
½ tsp nutmeg
¼ tsp cloves
¼ tsp ginger
Optional:
½ cup walnuts or pecans, chopped
½ cup raisins

Procedure:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 8”x8” baking pan with parchment paper in the center only.  Grease the sides.

In a large bowl combine the dry ingredients: oats, quinoa, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, cloves, ginger and nutmeg. Set aside.

In a second smaller bowl, mash bananas to a smooth texture. Set aside.

In a third bowl, whisk eggs together until scrambled. Add vanilla, honey, nut butter and sweet potato puree; combine. Add mashed bananas to wet mixture and blend together (a spatula works best).

**TIP**Steps 2 and 3 and be combined if using a blender. Add all wet ingredients to blender.  Blend for 20-30 seconds on medium speed until all ingredients are combined.  The only difference is you will get a smoother texture, since the banana will become pureed instead of smashed.**

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Now combine the wet and dry mixtures together. Batter should not be too runny. If it is, add more quinoa or oats until desired texture.

Bake for 25-30 minutes until bars are golden brown and firm to touch. Remove and let cool completely in baking pan. Cut into 16-18 squares. May store in fridge for up to 4 days or freeze.

These can easily be made into muffins. I use silicone liners, but traditional liners will work as well. The batter typically makes 16 muffins, but you can make them smaller if you’d like, just reduce the baking time.

These are so easy to make and so satisfying! I usually make large batches of them and freeze.

They warm up perfectly in the microwave, or thaw in the fridge overnight.

Remember to give thanks to the sweet potato as well. Don’t let pumpkin have all the fun!!!

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Happy Baking!

 

fitness, health, workout

Top 5 things you should do during your workout!

Have you ever dreaded going to they gym?  Felt a little overwhelmed by all the equipment, the size of the facility and all of the people?  And if you actually made it to the gym, were you unsure of where to start?  You’re not alone.  More than half of gym goers aren’t working out properly or making effective use of their time.  But who’s to blame them?   Gyms can be so overwhelming and without a personal trainer to assist it’s easy to get it wrong.

As a health and fitness coach, I cannot stress enough that the most important thing to remember is that everyone is at a different fitness level.  Do not expect to walk into a gym after not working out for sometime (or not at all) and do the same as others!  Your workout is for YOU and YOU only.  It’s your time to do something good for yourself!  Enjoy!  Who cares what everyone else is doing?

Your first goals need to be proper form and technique.  Slow and steady wins the race at the gym, otherwise injuries will occur.  If you’re unsure of a certain move or how to use a piece of equipment, ask a fitness professional at the gym to assist you.  Again, your safety comes first!  You only have one body so keep it safe.

The framework of the workout below can easily be adjusted to fit any fitness level and be accomplished either at the gym or at home.  It’s only FIVE different phases to use while creating a workout routine for your self.  It’s good to do your home work and go in with a plan.  That will make things less intimidating.

  1.  WARM-UP.  Warming up seems to be the one thing that most gym goers do not do or do not do effectively.  The funny thing is that it takes the least amount of time and prevents the most amount of injuries.  The warm up should include stretching, flexibility training and cardio, and on average take about 10 minutes total.Examples of an effective warm up are:
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    FOAM ROLLER:  TFL Stretch
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    STATIC STRETCH:  Standing Adductor
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    DYNAMIC STRETCH:  Tube Walking Side to SideIn addition to your stretching and flexibility training you’ll want to include cardio, about 5-10 minutes to your Warm-Up routine.  Treadmills, rowing machines or stationary bikes are great options to accomplish this.
  2. CORE/BALANCE/PLOYMETRIC.  The core (or abdomen) is the main hub of our body and needs, in my opinion, a signficant amount of time spent in developing it.  Think about how often you (should) use your core muscles.  It’s the center of all movement in the body and supports your posture and lower back and, with proper training can improve both.  Balance training links directly to the core and will help prevent lower lower extremity injuries.  For plyometric training it involves quick and powerful movements causing the muscle to contract, like a ‘cocking’ motion.  This doesn’t mean you have to complete all three types of training for this phase of your workout. Choose one or more depending on your fitness level.  Another option is to find exercises that incorporate all three moves. Examples of Core/Balance/Plyometric training are:
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    CORE:  Two-Leg Floor Bridge
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    CORE and BALANCE:  Single-Leg Lift and Chop
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    PLYOMETIC:  Squat Jump with Stabilization
  3. SPEED/AGILITY/QUICKNESS.  This may be something new to many of you, but what’s great about SAQ training is that it’s fun and effective.  (SAQ is the favorite phase of my workouts!)  It allows the body to enhance how you accelerate, decelerate and stabilize your entire body.  The speed gives you the ability to move your body in one intended direction as fast as possible.  The agility gives you the ability to accelerate, decelerate, stabilize, and change direction quickly while maintaining proper posture.  And the quickness gives you the ability to react and change your body position with maximal rate of force production, in all planes of motion and body positions.  The best way I can describe this phase of the workout is like playing Red Light, Green Light (taking you back to grade school).  Stop Go, Stop Go, Go Stop Go! Examples of SAQ are:
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    SAQ:  Box Drill, 10 yards each sprint98d24800080b405e80cfa8c29763b54e.jpg (736×348)
    SAQ:  Speed Ladders (using taped off boxes)
  4. RESISTANCE.  The resistance training phase is about the body increasing functional capacity.  In other words, building muscle.  It’s up to you how much or little time you want to spend here, and whether you’re looking to build muscle endurance, enlarge the muscles, build strength or increase power.  Again, everyone is at a fitness level and if you’re a beginner, you should choose endurance.  What’s great about resistance training is that you can use your own body weight, bands, free weights, medicine balls, strength machines, kettle bells, TRX and BOSU balls.Examples of Resistance training are:
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    Squat, Curl to Press
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    Push Ups
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    Standing Cable Row
  5. COOL-DOWN.  Ah, the cool down!  You’ve earned it.  This is the time to put yourself in a state of rest.  The cool down has tons of benefits like reducing your heart and breathing rates, cooling your body temperature and returning the muscles back to their optimal length.  It all sounds very scientific and there definitely is a science behind working out in general! Examples of a Cool Down are:
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    Foam Roller Stretch:  Hamstring
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    Static Stretching:  Soleus

And just like your Warm Up, you can Cool Down by getting back on the treadmill for 5-10 minutes at a SLOW pace to cool down the body.

A workout should take you about an hour in total if you’re only focused on one portion of your body (which I highly recommend).  Creating a workout schedule is really important.  For example, working out Monday, Wednesday and Friday is optimal, separating out muscle groups:  Monday: Back and Chest,  Wednesday: Legs, and Friday:  Shoulders and Arms.  This way your muscles rest in-between workouts and have time to recover.  I suggest writing this down on a calendar so you can plan out the entire month, and have accountability to it!

The important thing, with any workout, is to mix it up.  Don’t do the same routine over and over.  Not only will you become bored, but your muscles will get muscle memory and stop growing or strengthening and you’ll plateau.

It’s time to start enjoying your workouts again, and with the above routine I KNOW you will!